News for Professionals: Career Advice and Ideas

We get it, you’re busy. So, the Convene editors have curated the latest tips and trends in the world of work for you. Take a look at what caught our eye this past week. Don’t Take Your Head Out of the Clouds! Far from a waste of time, daydreaming might be one of the best things you can do with your free time, according to Rebecca Renner for The New York Times. New research shows that daydreaming can inspire happiness and productivity if you purposefully engage with meaningful topics, such as pleasant memories or imagined scenes of triumph in the face of all odds. Stop Trying to Make ‘Multitasking’ Happen: 5 Ways to Beat Workplace Distractions and Keep Yourself on Task While multitasking may help us get things done, there are long-term costs — we’re more prone to make mistakes, miss critical cues, and fail to retain information. The solution isn’t to beat yourself up or work more hours. Instead, Forbes offers five strategies you can implement today to become more focused. When Is It Necessary to Turn on Your Video in a Zoom Meeting? More than a year after many of us started working remotely, we’re still asking the same question, often several times a day: During a meeting, should I turn my camera on or can I keep it off? Courtney McCluney, Ph.D., an assistant professor of organizational behavior at Cornell’s Industrial and Labor Relations, tackles that question and more in the latest episode of Fast Company’s new podcast Hit the Ground Running. Subtract: Why Getting to Less Can Mean Thinking More In our efforts to improve our lives, our work, and society as a whole, we overwhelmingly add — be it objects, ideas, or social systems. In his new book Subtract: The Untapped Science of Less, Leidy Klotz, Ph.D., an associate professor at the University of Virginia, argues that we fail to consider the power of subtracting to change things for the better. The genesis of his idea? It came from playing with Lego bricks with his three-year-old son, as he shares in this Behavioral Scientist excerpt from his book.

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career advice

We get it, you’re busy. So, the Convene editors have curated the latest tips and trends in the world of work for you. Take a look at what caught our eye this past week.

Don’t Take Your Head Out of the Clouds!

Far from a waste of time, daydreaming might be one of the best things you can do with your free time, according to Rebecca Renner for The New York Times. New research shows that daydreaming can inspire happiness and productivity if you purposefully engage with meaningful topics, such as pleasant memories or imagined scenes of triumph in the face of all odds.

Stop Trying to Make ‘Multitasking’ Happen: 5 Ways to Beat Workplace Distractions and Keep Yourself on Task

While multitasking may help us get things done, there are long-term costs — we’re more prone to make mistakes, miss critical cues, and fail to retain information. The solution isn’t to beat yourself up or work more hours. Instead, Forbes offers five strategies you can implement today to become more focused.

When Is It Necessary to Turn on Your Video in a Zoom Meeting?

More than a year after many of us started working remotely, we’re still asking the same question, often several times a day: During a meeting, should I turn my camera on or can I keep it off? Courtney McCluney, Ph.D., an assistant professor of organizational behavior at Cornell’s Industrial and Labor Relations, tackles that question and more in the latest episode of Fast Company’s new podcast Hit the Ground Running.

Subtract: Why Getting to Less Can Mean Thinking More

In our efforts to improve our lives, our work, and society as a whole, we overwhelmingly add — be it objects, ideas, or social systems. In his new book Subtract: The Untapped Science of Less, Leidy Klotz, Ph.D., an associate professor at the University of Virginia, argues that we fail to consider the power of subtracting to change things for the better. The genesis of his idea? It came from playing with Lego bricks with his three-year-old son, as he shares in this Behavioral Scientist excerpt from his book.

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