3 Australians Delivering Groundbreaking Work

Dr. Micheal Wagels In Sydney, light waves propel the internet. In Brisbane, 3D printing replaces missing bone. Australian innovation is thriving, and you can see it now, from field-leading experts. Australia Innovates features six video stories of world-first pioneers from the Southern Hemisphere. Meet three of them, and watch the full series: 1. Harnessing Light to Revolutionize Communication: University of Sydney nanoscientist Professor Ben Eggleton describes his development of a powerful thumbnail-size photonic chip, designed to efficiently speed communications using nanoscopic light. “Building things that are going to change the world—that would be my enduring legacy for Australia,” says Eggleton, who leads a new field called nanophotonics, responsible for tens of thousands of Australian jobs—with the potential to transform global communications. Discover how Eggleton is revolutionizing how the world communicates. 2. Launching A New Era in Manufacturing: “It’s such an exciting time for Australia,” says Swinburne University of Technology Professor Bronwyn Fox. “There are so many more startups than there have ever been, with really amazing, cutting-edge technology.” Fox, a materials engineer, drives growth of Australia’s advanced manufacturing sector by developing 3D-printed carbon fibre composites quickly at a large scale, with less waste. Used in everything from consumer goods to aeroplanes, the high-strength, lightweight materials enable lighter-weight transport, which uses less fuel and produces fewer harmful emissions. Learn more about Fox’s groundbreaking work. 3. Changing Lives with 3D-Printed Bones: Plastic surgeon Dr. Michael Wagels describes his work at the Queensland University of Technology developing a 3D-printing procedure that promotes regrowth of missing bone, helping patients avoid amputations and complications. “To hear people talking to me about … how they could see the potential for their own patients was something I guess I hadn’t prepared for,” he says. Learn more about how Wagels’ experimental procedure changed the life of his first patient.

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Dr. Micheal Wagels

Dr. Micheal Wagels

Dr. Micheal Wagels

In Sydney, light waves propel the internet. In Brisbane, 3D printing replaces missing bone. Australian innovation is thriving, and you can see it now, from field-leading experts.

Australia Innovates features six video stories of world-first pioneers from the Southern Hemisphere. Meet three of them, and watch the full series:

1. Harnessing Light to Revolutionize Communication: University of Sydney nanoscientist Professor Ben Eggleton describes his development of a powerful thumbnail-size photonic chip, designed to efficiently speed communications using nanoscopic light.

“Building things that are going to change the world—that would be my enduring legacy for Australia,” says Eggleton, who leads a new field called nanophotonics, responsible for tens of thousands of Australian jobs—with the potential to transform global communications.

Discover how Eggleton is revolutionizing how the world communicates.

2. Launching A New Era in Manufacturing: “It’s such an exciting time for Australia,” says Swinburne University of Technology Professor Bronwyn Fox. “There are so many more startups than there have ever been, with really amazing, cutting-edge technology.”

Fox, a materials engineer, drives growth of Australia’s advanced manufacturing sector by developing 3D-printed carbon fibre composites quickly at a large scale, with less waste. Used in everything from consumer goods to aeroplanes, the high-strength, lightweight materials enable lighter-weight transport, which uses less fuel and produces fewer harmful emissions.

Learn more about Fox’s groundbreaking work.

3. Changing Lives with 3D-Printed Bones: Plastic surgeon Dr. Michael Wagels describes his work at the Queensland University of Technology developing a 3D-printing procedure that promotes regrowth of missing bone, helping patients avoid amputations and complications.

“To hear people talking to me about … how they could see the potential for their own patients was something I guess I hadn’t prepared for,” he says.

Learn more about how Wagels’ experimental procedure changed the life of his first patient.

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